how to have your alien comment on their conventionally-attractive human friend's appearance while still being alien

  • DO:
  • c: How do I look?
  • a: [looks up from book] The same as you did yesterday. [back to book]
  • OR:
  • c: How do I look?
  • a: [quick medical examination] Not wounded, no bruises, mentally and emotionally stable, possibility of cells becoming carcinogenic but that's normal for your species, otherwise perfectly healthy.
  • OR:
  • c: How do I look?
  • a: ...Symmetrical?
  • OR:
  • c: How do I look?
  • a: Two arms, two legs, a lot of hair on your head and a thin coat everywhere else, embarrassingly few tentacles [et cetera.]
  • OR:
  • c: How do I look?
  • a: [thinks] Can you run in those heels? How many pockets do you have in that coat?
  • DON'T:
  • c: How do I look?
  • a: You're too old, your hips are too wide, and your eyes are too big. You're ugly, but it's the personality that counts.

Not one single hurtful thing ever got changed by someone grinning and bearing it.

Hurtful things changed because people have said ‘That hurts me. Stop.’

And every time you try to silence someone and tell them that they shouldn’t be hurt, shouldn’t be offended, shouldn’t choose this battle, that this isn’t important and that other things are more important - you are serving the hurtful rather than the hurt.

secondlina:

A comic about the different types of attraction one might feel. I saw these descriptions floating around on tumblr and felt compelled to add visuals. They are from a website about asexuality. Although, I think people who are not asexual feel these regularly too. There’s all kinds of attractions for all kinds of people. Enjoy.

secondlina:

A comic about the different types of attraction one might feel. I saw these descriptions floating around on tumblr and felt compelled to add visuals. They are from a website about asexuality. Although, I think people who are not asexual feel these regularly too. There’s all kinds of attractions for all kinds of people. Enjoy.

I’m still wary of taking the media-friendly, chattering-classes stance that labels don’t matter, that we should chuck them in the bin; I’m labelled gay, and I love that label, I need it. Equally, if you’re working in a car factory and you’ve been closeted for the entire 50 years of your life, you’re carrying an awful and important label. They aren’t easily shrugged off. But maybe we need more labels. Like, five million more, and that’s just for starters.

We need a vocabulary that will fit the sheer complexity of ordinary men and women.

-Russell T. Davies

source (in sidebar)